Vendor fabulousness: Hair that Moves

It really was such an amazing two-day photo shoot for the 2017 Fall/Winter Issue of New Hampshire Magazine BRIDE. The weather was quite cooperative on our first day of shooting, and it added a lot of texture to the images- SNOW- on the second. Hey, if you are looking to recreate a winter wedding, you really can't ask for a better background than snow falling to the ground, right?

We had an ALL STAR cast of New England wedding vendors we brought together for this concept. I am so grateful for each and every one of their contributions and I think it's important to share all of their fabulousness with you. I asked them to answer a few questions about their photo shoot inspiration as well as a few questions about their business and themselves.  It's always a good idea to understand and get to know the vendors who help you with your wedding day.

We are starting our vendor series off with the amazing Lena Hartford, owner of Hair that Moves, a traveling wedding hair stylist.  I've known Lena for close to 10 years now and she is one of my favorite hair stylist out there, as well as a dear friend and my personal hair stylist.  Super easy to work with, very calming on the day of the wedding, and just an all around wonder woman.  Mother of two awesome kids, Lena also has an additional business - a traveling hair salon.  From cuts, to colors, to updos for a fancy night out, Lena is your woman. 

For the photo shoot, I asked that she work with two models and make both of their styles modern in construction, with not a ton of additional direction.  We all shared a Pinterest board to show where the design was heading and Lena knocked it out of the park with our two models... can't wait to show you all of the images this fall when the magazine comes out.  In the meantime, here are a few questions I asked each vendor and this is what Lena had to say:

1. What does a NH wedding mean to you? Favorite venue, favorite aspect, favorite season as examples.

 LH: This is a tricky one, I grew up in NH and really like the seacoast but I am a lake girl so I really am drawn to lakeside venues, where the feel is relaxed and brings special memories of childhood and summers and togetherness into a wedding. Not sure I can name one venue. I do love the fall here in NH, although the summer months can be great too!
 

2. What inspired you to create your design for the photo shoot, and what did you actually create that was modern?

LH: The inspiration for the hair designs for this shoot were created off of a photo that I really wanted to emulate, and the shoot was a little too modern for  that one shot, but we made it cleaner and tighter for the modern, clean look. I created a knot on some gorgeous straight red hair, and a bigger full pony for our other look!

3. Tell us something fun about you that potential clients would enjoy learning about.

LH: Something fun about me, well I like to have fun.... I love music- its good for the soul-but probably that I love attending concerts- anything from 90's hop hop to country- I love it all!

 

 

Wedding planning advice: What should you expect from your wedding venue manager?

Reception venue image from Inn by the Sea in Cape Elizabeth, Maine.  Photo by Eric McCallister Photography.

Reception venue image from Inn by the Sea in Cape Elizabeth, Maine.  Photo by Eric McCallister Photography.

When it comes to planning and successfully executing your wedding day, each and every one of your vendors plays a vital and important role. They have helped with hundreds of weddings before yours and they will help hundreds of clients after you, so they're chock full of expertise and they definitely know what they're doing.  Now, all of this assumes you're working with a professional who has been in the business for multiple years and has the record to prove such accolades.  For the sake of this blog series, let's assume the vendors I'm referring to are all amazing and the kinds of vendors you're looking for to help plan your wedding.

As a wedding planner, we have been approached many times by potential clients interested in getting married at a venue.  Often times, these are venues that serve as a destination location: providing overnight accommodations, multiple venues for your rehearsal dinner, welcome reception, wedding and farewell brunch, as well as providing services and amenities for your guests to enjoy while they're on property.

It's always an interesting conversation to have with potential clients about the value of hiring a wedding planner when they already have a venue or banquet manager.  They assume their venue manager will serve as their full-service wedding planner and because they will be on-site for the wedding ceremony and at least part of the reception, clients are often cautious to spend additional dollars of their budget for a service they think they are already paying for.  

In the case of your venue manager, they have an incredible amount of tasks and responsibilities that only they, as experts, should be taking care of for you.  I think it's important to show you just how many tasks they are responsible for because it will help establish the inherent differences between the wedding planner you may decide to hire and the venue manager that you work with. 

A nautical reception by candlelight.  Image by Eric McCallister Photography at Inn by the Sea, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

A nautical reception by candlelight.  Image by Eric McCallister Photography at Inn by the Sea, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

Here is a list of some of the tasks your venue manager will work directly with you on throughout your wedding planning process:

  • Helping you select your menu: hors d'oeuvres, dinner, desserts, bar options, what style of reception to have that works best for your wedding style and their venue's capabilities.
  • Helping you decide on your ceremony and reception timing: are you having your ceremony at your reception venue? If not, what time is best for guests to arrive for your cocktail hour after an off-site ceremony? How late will your event end? Are there after party options, noise restrictions, extra reception hours to purchase?
  • Coordination of hotel room blocks, including negotiating rates.
  • Offering vendor recommendations: vendors who have worked at their property before and have had successful reviews from past clients.
  • Helps advise where everything should be set up within your cocktail hour and reception space(s): gift table, place card table, favors, bars, dessert stations, food stations- if applicable.
  • Helps you create a rain plan if you plan on having some event(s) outdoors.
  • Helps to keep you on your schedule throughout the day- first dance, cake cutting, food service.
A nautical dinner menu by Gus & Ruby Letterpress.  Image by Eric McCallister at the Inn by the Sea, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

A nautical dinner menu by Gus & Ruby Letterpress.  Image by Eric McCallister at the Inn by the Sea, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

Now, this list isn't complete and there are a few of these tasks that an outside wedding planner can and often will help you with.  This list shows you the parts of the planning process you get to directly be involved with your venue manager. 

Here's another list of the tasks your venue manager has that you don't get to see, but are still very vital to the success of your wedding day:

  • For destination wedding venues, making sure the welcome baskets are delivered to each room.
  • They work with the chef to select the best menu options that their staff and service levels can provide.
  • Once they work with you to design your wedding vision, they meet with the chef to adjust the menu to best accommodate your needs and requests. This may include dietary restrictions or menu style changes specific for your overall wedding design.
  • The venue manager is in charge of the staff that sets up your wedding day, which may include multiple locations.  This includes: setting up chairs, tables, linens, napkins, china, glassware, flatware set up, bar set ups, ceremony chairs- set up and break down.
  • The venue manager is responsible for orchestrating the timing of the kitchen staff to serve your wedding menu in a successful manner.
  • The venue manager is responsible for receiving all of your outside vendors- photographer, videographer, florist, lighting specialist, cake designer, etc. They provide directions and instructions on how to load in and where to set up.
  • They are responsible for feeding your vendors in a timely manner to ensure your timeline remains intact.

This list is also not complete, but it gives you a good idea of just how many responsibilities your venue manager has behind the scenes to help ensure you have a successful wedding day. Stay tuned for some future Vlogs where I interview some of my favorite venue managers to hear even more about their role and responsibilities!

All in all, I hope this explanation helps to show the importance of your venue manager and how their role is unique and specific. I think education is a major piece to the wedding planning process.  It helps gives you an understanding of the industry and the many people who will help you throughout your wedding. 

Happy planning!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vex Robotics

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 While Chris and Kate went on their long awaited honeymoon, I had the absolute pleasure of being a part of the Vex Robotics Regional competition at Manchester Community College. Seeing as my first event with Malloy events was at MCC, it was great to work in the venue again and with its staff.  

      Alright, so lets talk shop about what we actually did. For this event we had a full dmx controlled lighting system, using not only new lights but a new brand new lighting board. We rolled out our new Stiletto Z6's moving heads and Pro Kontrol lighting board both by Blizzard Lighting.  With the nature of this event, all of the lights were set to a pre-programed chase that revolved what stage the event was at. 

    How could I forget to mention that we built custom risers to build a "stadium feel" to accommodate two hundred plus people.  All in all, this was an awesome event to be a part of. Granted, I know nothing about robotics it was really cool to see high school students' work pay off.

I look forward to working with Vex again in the near future!

 

Nick 

Editorial Feature: SEACOAST WEDDINGS 2017

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Wow! What a great way to announce to the wedding world that we are back at it! Chris and I were so honored to be featured in the newest issue of Seacoast Weddings Magazine, but then to find out that we were actually chosen as the Best Wedding of 2017??  That's just too much for us.  It was so incredible to get to relive our wedding day on the pages of such a beautifully produced magazine.  Zachary was especially excited to see that his photo made the article too! It's making me smile as I even write this blog post :)

 

Turns out we were also featured in an Expert Advice article at the end of the magazine.  I was asked about some of my best wedding planning tips and since I had just recently gone through the whole bride-getting-married scenario, I was more than happy to share some wedding day wisdom with their readers.

Oh yeah... who is that couple on the header of this article....

Oh yeah... who is that couple on the header of this article....

We are even more excited to be working with Seacoast Weddings Magazine on a regular basis, providing video blog content for their website every month! We just recorded our first four sessions and we should be getting those online in the next week or so to share with you so stay tuned for more exciting advice from our office! In the meantime you can watch a sneak peek from our FB page that we posted live yesterday:

We will let you know when the first video blog is getting released and in the meantime, enjoy the weekend and GO PATS!!!!

 

 

Coming soon: The Malloy Experience

We are very excited and have been quite busy at the studio preparing for photo shoots and creating customized floral design packages.  Although we aren't ready for the full reveal, we wanted to give a little insight to a major project we have been working on.

Over the next few weeks we will be formally introducing a new service to our clients, The Malloy Experience. The Malloy Experience is a combination of curated venues and customized floral and event design packages that take the very best of a venue and combine it with the very best that Malloy Events has to offer.  This experience includes design time with Kate and Chris directly, assistance at the very beginning stages of your wedding and event planning process, and the perfect blend of your style and vision paired with incredible venues in Northern New England.

We are kicking off the Malloy Experience with two venues, in New Hampshire and Maine.  Stay tuned for full floral design descriptions as well as custom lounge and tent design concepts and lots and lots of photos showing exactly how we can help you plan your wedding or event at one of these amazing venues.

More very soon, including some behind the scenes videos of our on-site venue photo shoots and interviews with the teams we are partnering with at each venue.

Exciting stuff!

 

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Introducing Nicholas Einstman!

Introducing Nicholas Einstman!

It is with great Pleasure that we introduce Malloy Event’s newest member, Nicholas “Nick” Einstman! Nick is a recent graduate of Plymouth State University. While studying Communications Film and Media, Nick kept him self busy by working various jobs. During his semesters at PSU Nick was the General manager for 91.7 WPCR Plymouth and a Camera operator for PB TV. However when Nick was home for breaks he lead a very different life. He was a Light and Sound Tech for various nightclubs, sporting events, festivals and private events. 

            Did we mention that during this entire time Nick was a freelance videographer as well? Yeah he does that too, come to think of it we did refer to him as a “Jack of all trades” during his interview multiple times.  A title well earned in our opinion! 

            When he isn’t playing with lights, shooting video or reading up on current social media trends. You can usually find Nick tending to his record collection or exploring the seacoast with his camera! We are very excited to have him join our team as Associate Technical Director and we know you will be too!

 

Private holiday parties: tips and trends

It's almost the Most Wonderful Tiiiiime of the Year. I can't actually believe it's November. For us that means the holiday party season is upon us for both private parties and corporate parties.  Although we do many more large-scale corporate events in general, we get called in to people's homes and to smaller businesses to help plan, design and execute their special holiday soirees.

I thought I'd separate the two types of events and talk today about private holiday parties.  There are a few different things to think about when planning a party at your house or venue and hopefully I can help steer you in the right direction:

Size of the party: Are you thinking about inviting your closest 6 friends for Thanksgiving, do you have a 30-person extended family like I do, or are you planning a fete for your small business with less than 50 employees? With every event you plan, the quickest way to affect your budget is by deciding on the size of the event. Every person added means more food, more alcohol, more rentals, more invitations.  Everything is scaled by the number of guests you're expecting so be reasonable when selecting who's coming to your event.

Time of the event: If you decide to host your party during a typical meal time: 11-1 for a lunch party, 4-7 for a dinner party, you should expect to feed your guests enough food to be considered a full meal.  That could be a sit-down dinner or heavy passed hors d'oeuvres, but the quantity has to have substance.  If you decide to do a later event or a pre-dinner event, you can get away with slightly less food and or different types of food.  A post-dinner party could include desserts and coffee.  A pre-dinner party could include smaller passed hors d'oeuvres and wine or champagne.

Menu: Once you decide on your guest list and the time of your event, you can start thinking about your menu.  You can theme your menu on the design of the event, the color palate, or you could even ask guests to bring an item and host a pot-luck party.  If you're hosting and cooking yourself, please please please do as much in advance as possible to simplify your life the day of your party.  If you're hiring a caterer be prepared for a higher cost but no mess and no fuss and also revel in a clean kitchen at the end of the night that you didn't have to wash yourself :) Go the traditional turkey route or think outside the box and serve mini courses to keep the conversation going throughout the night.  The menu can be as creative as you'd like it to be.

Design: This is the fun part- also happens to be my favorite part.  There are so many directions you can go in when designing your holiday party.  First, I would take stock of what you already own.  Do you have a table cloth you want to base the color palate on? Do you have ornaments you could put in a glass vase to make a centerpiece?  There's no need to go out and buy everything just for this one event.  Start with what you already have- it's also a great way to get a sense of your own event style since you've already invested in these pieces. Here is a list of traditional and not-so-traditional holiday themes you might consider:

  • old-fashioned - 40's or 50's style holiday party
  • woodland- pine, branches, flannel and plaid
  • winter wonderland- snowflakes, silver and gold accents, ice details
  • gingerbread- kid theme, stripes, candy canes, reds, greens, white
  • traditional- glass balls in assorted colors, pine boughs, colored lights
  • modern- white and navy blue, clean hydrangea centerpieces, lots of votive candles

 

above images by Mark Davidson Photography, Studio Nouveau, and douglaslevy Photography

There are plenty of other themes you could work with, this list is just a starting point for you to get some inspiration from.  Look on Pinterest, if you haven't already, because you will find thousands of design inspirations.

Other small details to think about: coming up with a signature drink, perhaps an activity such as a gift exchange, and a take gift home for your guests who came out to see you for this special evening.

Hosting a holiday party doesn't have to be stressful. It should be enjoyable and hopefully a few of these tips will help guide you as you plan yours.

Happy Holidays (early to say, I know)!!!

KM

Design elements: Cafe lights

Strands of cafe lights 30" apart with varying sizes of white even-ribbed paper lanterns.  Image by Mark Davidson Photography.

Strands of cafe lights 30" apart with varying sizes of white even-ribbed paper lanterns.  Image by Mark Davidson Photography.

I wanted to start a series that takes individual design elements and breaks them down to show you how you can incorporate them into your special event, corporate event or wedding and also to show you the cost associated with each element.

Today I'm talking about cafe lights.  They're a very versatile and cost effective lighting element that you can customize to fit your color palate, overall event theme, and even your budget. 

Here's some of the great things cafe lights can do for your event:

  • Create a lower ceiling, making a room or tent feel more intimate
  • Create a special area within a room or tent- dance floor area, VIP area
  • Add color to your overall design
  • Add texture to your overall design
  • Add ambient light when placed on dimmers
  • Add helpful overall light when used at full power
  • Use them alone or with paper lanterns, or with a mix of exposed bulbs and lanterns
  • Create an old-school or antique feel to your event using old-fashioned Edison bulbs

How do you install them:

Cafe lights aren't for the faint of heart when it comes to the installation, especially when you're in a tent. I would suggest hiring a lighting or event design company to take care of this task for you.  In a tent: You already have lots of hanging points to work with in a tent- center poles and side poles.  You also have the ability to add additional hanging points with the help of strong cables installed down the middle of the tent along the center poles.  These cables allow you to hang from the middle of the tent but not just at the center poles.  The more hanging points you place, the more cafe strands you will need.  That also means the more paper lanterns you will need so that adds to the expense and the overall installation and breakdown time.  Also, you need lots and lots of zip ties to secure each strand and cable to ensure the design stays in place.

In a venue: Some venues will have hanging points you can work with.  Others have drop ceilings you can tie into.  If you have no options and are not allowed to install any hooks or nails at the venue you're working at, you can bring your own hanging points.  A large base and upright pole in the corner of a room can create a hanging point for multiple strands of cafe lights. Make sure you have plenty of sandbags to weigh down each base, as these can get pretty heavy when you add lots of strands of lights.

What do they look like:

Here are a number of examples of cafe lights in different venues, styles and colors

A traditional ocean side tented wedding at the ViewPoint Hotel in Maine. Image by Mark Davidson Photography.

A traditional ocean side tented wedding at the ViewPoint Hotel in Maine. Image by Mark Davidson Photography.

Star lanterns on cafe light strands installed with heavy bases and upright poles in a sports arena, Fieldhouse Sports, Bow, NH.

Star lanterns on cafe light strands installed with heavy bases and upright poles in a sports arena, Fieldhouse Sports, Bow, NH.

Star paper lanterns on cafe lights installed on heavy bases and uprights at Block Six in Portsmouth, NH.

Star paper lanterns on cafe lights installed on heavy bases and uprights at Block Six in Portsmouth, NH.

Cafe lights 12" apart with layers of ombre crepe paper rolls installed at Discover Portsmouth, Portsmouth, NH.

Cafe lights 12" apart with layers of ombre crepe paper rolls installed at Discover Portsmouth, Portsmouth, NH.

Cafe lights 12" apart installed with vintage map garlands at Discover Portsmouth, Portsmouth NH.

Cafe lights 12" apart installed with vintage map garlands at Discover Portsmouth, Portsmouth NH.

Paper lanterns on cafe strands installed on a long pole to create a cluster of clouds at a private tented wedding in Maine. Image by Brian Adams Photographics.

Paper lanterns on cafe strands installed on a long pole to create a cluster of clouds at a private tented wedding in Maine. Image by Brian Adams Photographics.

Close up of the cloud lantern installation. Photo by Brian Adams Photographics.

Close up of the cloud lantern installation. Photo by Brian Adams Photographics.

Drop ceiling cafe lights installation with paper lanterns at the Museum of Science, Boston, MA.

Drop ceiling cafe lights installation with paper lanterns at the Museum of Science, Boston, MA.

Multi-layered lantern and cafe light installation over a dance floor in a Sperry Tent.

Multi-layered lantern and cafe light installation over a dance floor in a Sperry Tent.

Exposed cafe lights installed throughout a double-wide Sperry Tent, private wedding in Cumberland Foreside Maine. Image by Emilie Inc.

Exposed cafe lights installed throughout a double-wide Sperry Tent, private wedding in Cumberland Foreside Maine. Image by Emilie Inc.

Star lantern installation with cafe lights in a Sperry Tent for a welcome reception on Martha's Vineyard, MA.

Star lantern installation with cafe lights in a Sperry Tent for a welcome reception on Martha's Vineyard, MA.

How much do they cost:

The cost of a cafe light installation depends on a number of things: the type of installation, the scale of the installation and the types of embellishments to the installation.  A tented wedding or special event with just exposed cafe lights on one cable run down the center of a tent could range in price from $750-$2000.00 If you added paper lanterns to each of the lights that could add an additional $250-$1000.  At a venue that has a drop ceiling or hanging points, the cost will be similar to a tent.  Stand alone installations without any hanging points can add additional cost.  Cafe lights are a great way to add a high-impact design element at a reasonable cost to your overall budget.  This cost, however, includes not only the cafe strands or paper lanterns themselves, but also the labor for installation and break down of the lighting element.  It takes anywhere from 1-5 hours to install a cafe light design with anywhere from 1-4 staff members.  All of that has to be taken down too after the event it over.  Ladders, scissor lifts, safety cables all have to be incorporated into the cost of the total installation.

We think cafe lights are a great addition to your event or wedding design.  Hopefully these images and the information we shared with you helps you decide whether they're right for your event and budget.  Happy designing!

KM

Malloy Events is an event design and production company specializing in corporate events, weddings, and non-profit galas.  Based on the Seacoast of New Hampshire, serving New England clients and beyond.

 

Event recap: The 2016 New Hampshire Film Festival

Every fall for the past several years we have been involved in the social events surrounding the amazing New Hampshire Film Festival, located in the vibrant city of Portsmouth, NH.  It has been a pleasure and honor to help design and execute the Red Carpet Official Opening, Hospitality Party, and VIP After Party for the past three years.  This year we expanded our participation even further, designing and staging Headquarters for the weekend as well as proving some production for an additional sponsored party right after the Red Carpet event ended on Friday night. 

We have posted quite a few photos and videos showing the process and final product around each party and I thought a recap post would give some further insight as to how we have grown and expanded our production at this festival over the years. 

2014 was the first year Chris and I started collaborating on the film festival.  For quite a few years prior to that I helped design the Saturday Hospitality Party.  When Chris brought his level of production and audio/video equipment, we were able to expand and develop a more comprehensive design for the duration of the Film Festival weekend. 

2014 NHFF Parties:

2015 was the last year the Hospitality Party was hosted at Harbor Place, right on the water overlooking Maine.  We wanted to create an old Hollywood feel to the space, so we went with a red, black and white color palate and kept all the floral arrangements clean and sleek by using white orchids.

We also created the VIP after party at Martingale Wharf and tried to project the NHFF logo right on the water.  It looked pretty neat if you saw it in person, but projecting on a moving surface that's not completely black is challenging to capture on your iPhone :)

2015 NHFF Parties

Last year we created the Red Carpet Opening Ceremony event right outside of The Music Hall on Chestnut Street.  The street is closed around noon to give us time to set all the red carpets and screens and lighting throughout both sides of the street.  We wanted to create a show stopper for people walking down the street to stop and get involved with the festival. This year we were also knee deep in the First in the Nation Primary events around NH and I'm pretty sure we had four additional events happening on this very same day :)

The Hospitality Party was at 3S Artspace for the first time last year and we had a great time working with their staff to create a bold ceiling installation for people to enjoy throughout the day (Thanks Martin!).  The gallery space is a wonderful opportunity to hold events- it's a large, white, tall-ceilinged room that can be transformed any which way you can think up. 

2016 NHFF Parties

Wow, what a whirlwind this past weekend has been!  We started installing the Headquarters of the festival on Wednesday morning and worked with a lighting installation we had just created for a previous event, Tablescapes 2016.  We wanted to change and enhance the cafe lights we had already installed, so I decided to take the sunset colors of the logo- orange to pink- and create an ombre affect in the ceiling.  I used lots and lot (and lots) of crepe paper streamers and laid them out one at a time to complete the design.  The end result had warmth and brought some intimacy to the space that usually has a tall open ceiling right when you walk into the room.  We also brought in black floor to ceiling drape throughout the building, added our director's chairs, lounge furniture and created custom florals throughout the space.

The Friday night Red Carpet event was where we really added quite a few new elements including: (2) 65" flat screen televisions on truss that had both live video of people arriving for a photo op on the red carpet and also a live update of any and all social media surrounding the festival, using the hashtag #NHFF.  LED light panels were used throughout the Step and Repeat which produce camera-ready natural light. We also added (2) 12' tall truss towers at the bottom of the street that had up lights to enhance the aqua and orange Film Festival banner.  We even added a few oversized metal film strip holders to add to the look of the entrance to the Red Carpet. 

After the Red Carpet party ended, we quickly broke down the equipment and set up the red carpet, stantions and projection at 3S Artspace for an additional sponsored after party.

Saturday's Hospitality Party was once again at 3S Artspace, this time in their restaurant, Block Six, patio and side courtyard.  We wanted to enhance the indoor space with LED uplights and with some simple star paper lanterns in the colors of the NHFF logo.  We added flowers throughout the space as well.

After the Hospitality Party was broken down, we set up the entrance to the VIP After Party at Martingale Wharf, complete with the red carpet, stantions, LED uplights, LED Light Panels, and Projections for the sponsors.

As I write this, I realize how many events we completed in a short amount of time and with the help of our team, the Volunteers at the NHFF, the Music Hall staff, 3S Staff, and Martingale Wharf Staff.  If you add in the AMAZING weather all weekend, we had a great time and can't wait to collaborate with the NHFF team again in 2017!

 

KM

From Sketch to Final Design- Tablescapes 2016

Our final design next to the original sketch. 

Our final design next to the original sketch. 

When we get to work with clients who give us the ability to design whatever we think will best fit their event, we tend to think outside of the box.  This out of the box thinking can lead to really elaborate concepts that require a lot of production time. 

I thought it would be interesting to show you some of our initial ideas and how they were developed throughout the design process into the final versions we presented to our clients. This table is a good example of a design that ended up looking almost exactly like the initial sketch. 

 

The original concept, sketched out by me.  I have much more creative juices when I'm working with flowers, but I can at least get the concepts on paper.

The original concept, sketched out by me.  I have much more creative juices when I'm working with flowers, but I can at least get the concepts on paper.

We were asked to design a table for the 2016 Tablescapes art exhibit and fundraiser for an amazing seacoast organization, Arts In Reach.  AIR creates a supportive and enriching environment for teen girls through the arts.  They host a fundraising and awareness event every two years and this year their theme was Around the World.  We chose to design a table for England and Chris came up with the English pub for our concept.  Most people might have jumped to the tea party conclusion for England, but we wanted to do something a bit more unique and original.  Once I started working through some concepts for the pub, I drew the above sketch (no laughing please).  That sketch was further developed by Chris's genius ingenuity skills when he thought to add some lighting elements to the outer most layers of the pub. 

 A working outdoor light! We were trying to create the outside feeling of Tudor-style buildings.

 A working outdoor light! We were trying to create the outside feeling of Tudor-style buildings.

 

We did a pretty significant amount of research to find realistic elements- British tabloids, games- darts, backgammon, horse shoes, a traditional pub menu, and my favorite part of the table- a live showing of a football game on a flat screen television.

A close up of the football game on a flat screen as well as some of the tabletop details.

A close up of the football game on a flat screen as well as some of the tabletop details.

I also wanted to bring in a quirky piece of furniture to the pub so Chris built this table for me to paint in a similar style to the British flag. A very late night painting party with lots of painters tape later (2 am ish), and the finished table came out just how we wanted it to.

Not all designs start and end as similarly as this one did, but it's a fun process to take what's in your head and create a physical manifestation of it, especially as exactly as this one turned out.